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Pride Month 2020 (Things To Know About It)

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Pride Month 2020 (Things To Know About It)

When is it?

An Annual LGBT Pride Celebration Every year, during the month of June, the LGBT community celebrates in a number of different ways. Across the globe, various events are held during this special month as a way of recognizing the influence LGBT people have had around the world. Why was June chosen? Because it is when the Stonewall Riots took place, way back in 1969.

As well as being a month-long celebration, Pride month is also an opportunity to peacefully protest and raise political awareness of current issues facing the community. Parades are a prominent feature of Pride month, and there are many street parties, community events, poetry readings, public speaking, street festivals, and educational sessions all of which are covered by mainstream media and attracting millions of participants.

The New York Pride Parade is one of the largest and most well known parades to take place, with an estimated 500,000 people participating in it by the time it had reached its 25th anniversary.

Pride Month is so important because it marks the start of huge change within the LGBT+ community, as well as the wider societal implications. Although attitudes and injustice still remain, we have come a long way since the riots of 1969 and by continuing in this long standing tradition we continue to raise awareness, improve the attitudes of society and encourage inclusiveness. #Pride2020

What were the Stonewall Riots?

The riots were prompted by a raid that took place during the early morning, at the Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, Manhattan. The LGBT community held a series of spontaneous, often violent demonstrations to protest against the raid and calling for the establishment of places that gays and lesbians could go and be open about their sexual orientation. In such places there should be no fears of being arrested. The riots served as a catalyst for the rights of LGBT people, and within 6 months, 2 gay activist groups had formed in New York. Over the years since the event, many gay rights organisations have been formed. Not just in the US but around the world.

What is LGBT or Gay Pride?

It is a movement that celebrates sexual diversity. For lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people it is a way of protesting about discrimination and violence. It promotes their dignity, equal rights, self-affirmation, and is a way of increasing society’s awareness of the issues they face.

Who Started the June Celebration?

Known as the “Mother of Pride”, it was Brenda Howard who coordinated the first LGBT Pride march. As well as sparking the idea for a week of events around Pride Day. These events than developed into the annual LGBT celebrations held every June.

What LGBT Pride Month events will take place this year?

Drag Queen Vincent Leggett warms up the crowd at the first annual Pride In The Park kick-off party, hosted by Mayors Office of LGBTQ Affairs, at LOVE park, in Philadelphia, June 6, 2019.Drag Queen Vincent Leggett warms up the crowd at the first annual Pride In The Park kick-off party, hosted by Mayors Office of LGBTQ Affairs, at LOVE park, in Philadelphia, June 6, 2019.
NurPhoto via Getty Images, FILE

A number of official events that would normally be held in various cities across the nation throughout the month will now be taking place online. Here are some of the more prominent celebrations.

  • Boston Pride will host a series of virtual events throughout the month, including the raising of the rainbow pride flag on June 5 at 12 p.m. ET, a talk on June 5 with Eric Cervini, author of “The Deviant’s War: The Homosexual vs. the United States of America,” the annual Pride Lights on June 9 to commemorate those affected by the HIV/AIDS pandemic, as well as a pride festival and concert on June 13.
  • Los Angeles’ first-ever virtual pride parade will air as a 90-minute primetime special exclusively on Los Angeles ABC station KABC on June 13 from 7:30 to 9 p.m. PT, with an encore presentation on June 14 at 2 p.m. PT.
  • The first-ever virtual Trans March will kick off on June 26 at a to-be-decided time.
  • The New York City Pride Rally will take place virtually on June 26 at a to-be-decided time.
  • San Francisco Pride will host an online celebration and rally on June 27 from 1 p.m. to 9 p.m. PT and on June 28 from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. PT. The virtual event will feature live and prerecorded performances, greetings from LGBT community members, elected officials, and celebrities as well as speeches from thought leaders, drag and dance performances, DJ sets, and more.
  • Seattle Pride will hold a series of virtual events from June 26 through June 28, with specific times and more information to come.

How else will this year’s LGBT Pride Month be different?

The LGBT community has fully mobilized to support the real-time efforts of the Black Lives Matter movement and to amplify the voices of protesters marching for justice for George Floyd, an unarmed black man who died on May 25 in Minneapolis shortly after a white police officer was filmed kneeling on his neck for nearly nine minutes as three other officers stood by.

Last week, more than 100 LGBT and civil rights organizations signed an open letter condemning racism, racial violence and police brutality while calling for action to combat those scourges.

“The LGBTQ community knows about the work of resisting police brutality and violence. We celebrate June as Pride Month, because it commemorates, in part, our resisting police harassment and brutality at Stonewall in New York City, and earlier in California, when such violence was common and expected,” the letter states. “We remember it as a breakthrough moment when we refused to accept humiliation and fear as the price of living fully, freely, and authentically.”

A person holds a “Black Lives Matter” sign as as a heavy cloud of tear gas and smoke rises after being deployed by Seattle police as protesters rally against police brutality and the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, in Seattle, June 1, 2020.A person holds a “Black Lives Matter” sign as as a heavy cloud of tear gas and smoke rises after being deployed by Seattle police as protesters rally against police brutality and the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, in Seattle, June 1, 2020.
Lindsey Wasson/Reuters, FILE

“We understand what it means to rise up and push back against a culture that tells us we are less than, that our lives don’t matter,” the letter continues. “Today, we join together again to say #BlackLivesMatter and commit ourselves to the action those words require.”Sarah Kate Ellis, president of Los Angeles-based LGBT advocacy group GLAAD, told “Good Morning America” that it’s important to remember the 1969 Stonewall riots were spearheaded by many people of color. She went on to explain how this year’s Pride Month will undoubtedly be completely different.

“We’ll be centering and lifting up the voices of queer people of color, whose struggles are shared by the entire LGBTQ community,” Ellis said. “There can be no pride if it is not intersectional. We are Together in Pride.”


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